Entertainment in Lincoln’s Springfield (1834-1860)

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By Richard E. Hart This essay is a summary of the book Entertainment in Lincoln’s Springfield (1834-1860) by Richard E. Hart and published by the Abraham Lincoln Association in November of 2017. The public entertainments within a community are a good barometer of how its residents use their free time and what type of entertainments […]

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Abraham Lincoln’s Cyphering Book

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by Nerida F. Ellerton and M.A. (Ken) Clements The oldest extant handwritten manuscript of Abraham Lincoln is his cyphering book, which comprised written solutions to arithmetic problems that he solved when he was at school. The most detailed description and analysis of the manuscript is to be found in chapter 6 of our book, Abraham […]

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Abraham Lincoln on Civil Liberties

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By Hon. Frank J. Williams Imagine, if you will, that the United States suffers an unexpected attack.  The president deploys the armed forces and assumes extraordinary powers that go well beyond what the Constitution seems to allow.  Thousands of persons suspected of aiding the enemy are arrested and held without charge, or tried before military […]

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An Interview with Hon. Frank J. Williams on the Concept of Just War

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Unidentified Indiana Soldiers, LN-2353 Sara Gabbard:    How far back in history can you trace the concept of Just War? Frank Williams:  In the first millennium, Christians in the Roman Empire, who originally rejected any form of warfare in accordance with their beliefs, ultimately adopted a “Just War” rationale to the use of force against nations […]

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Thomas Lincoln Reconsidered

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Thomas Lincoln has been the subject of description and judgment since at least 1860 when a political biography of his son Abraham was written. Since then, thousands of books have been written about Abraham with most having brief descriptions of Thomas. Most published critical judgments of Thomas conclude that he was a miserable failure both as a man and as a father. It is time to take a fresh look at Thomas and reconsider those judgments and that wisdom.

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Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s Standing Lincoln: A Biographical Monument to Abraham Lincoln and its Legacy

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In a one-hundred-year-old barn in Cornish, New Hampshire, Augustus Saint-Gaudens reshaped the memory of Abraham Lincoln in sculpture as he spent months turning blocks of clay into the 16th President of the United States. With his 1887 sculpture, Abraham Lincoln: The Man, commonly known simply as Standing Lincoln, Saint-Gaudens redirected the legacy of Abraham Lincoln in sculpture away from a romanticized Lincoln to a simplistic and naturalistic statesman, preparing to speak before an audience as he so often did.

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God and Mr. Lincoln

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On the day in April 1837 that Abraham Lincoln rode into Springfield, Illinois, to set himself up professionally as a lawyer, the American republic was awash in religion. Lincoln, however, was neither swimming nor even bobbing in its current.

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