Teacher Resources

Programs:

In addition to offering unique programs that complement classroom content and goals, the Rolland Center for Lincoln Research at the Allen County Public Library offers tours and the following programming for school groups. As the Lincoln Collection encompasses a wide variety of topics and materials, we are able to accommodate diverse programs to suit educators’ needs. We invite teachers to explore field trip options with us, but if you cannot make it into the Center physically for a visit, Lincoln Librarians can bring programs to your classroom virtually. Contact us at [email protected] for inquiries.

 

Title: Causing a Civil War: Understanding the Beginnings and Ends of the Civil War

Topic: Civil War Overview

Description: Understanding all the players, issues, and concerns involved in the Civil War can be complicated. By using the lens of the Lincoln Collection’s primary sources, this introductory dive into the Civil War covers the main people involved, Lincoln’s influence on the war, major battles, and Generals who led their armies. Read Civil War letters and journals, see photographs from the battlefields and camps, and understand the war from the people who were there.

Target Audience: K-12

Indiana State Standards:

4.1.7 (4th grade: Explain the roles of various individuals, groups, and movements in the social conflicts leading to the Civil War)

4.1.8 (4th grade: Summarize the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency on Indiana and describe the participation of Indiana citizens in the Civil War)

8.1.30 (8th grade: Using primary and secondary sources, analyze an issue confronting the United States from colonial times through the Reconstruction period)

IS 1.7 (High School: Analyze how the Civil War affected men, women, and children on the home front. Explain how those on the home front helped the war effort)

I.S. 1.36 (High School: Analyze multiple, unexpected and complex causes and effects of events in the past)

U.S. 1.4 (High School: Describe causes and lasting effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the political controversies surrounding this time)

Outcomes: Students will understand the players involved in the Civil War, their beliefs, important dates and battles, as well as Lincoln’s influence and leadership. Students will also be able to explain the end of the war and Lincoln’s plan for America after the war. Students will have experience with primary source documents and photos related to the Civil War.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Title: “I vote you!” Lincoln and His Elections

Topic: Lincoln and Elections

Description: Elections today in the U.S. look a bit different than they did during Lincoln’s time. Explore the way candidates campaigned (if at all!), the way conventions were involved with their parties, and even who could vote and where to cast the ballots. Add in a Civil War and the Confederate States of America, and that creates an even more complicated election. Learn about all this though original ballots, campaign songs, and speeches.

Target Audience: Middle School students, High School students

Indiana State Standards:

4.1.8 (4th grade: Summarize the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency on Indiana and describe the participation of Indiana citizens in the Civil War)

8.1.30 (8th grade: Using primary and secondary sources, analyze an issue confronting the United States from colonial times through the Reconstruction period)

IS.1.6 (High School: Describe causes and lasting effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the political controversies surrounding this time)

USG 1.6 (High school: Compare and contrast unitary, confederate, and federal systems of government)

Outcomes: Students will be able to identify the different components of the 1860 and 1865 election. They will be able to explain the different political parties, the impact that the war had on elections, and how Lincoln was able to win two terms. Students will also be able to identify political support from newspapers, songsters, and election tickets. Students will be able to compare and contract current elections and mid-1800 elections.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Title: Lincoln’s Life: From Midwest to Best

Topic: Abraham Lincoln’s Life Overview

Description: Abraham Lincoln is known as a strong leader and as a model president. But what made him this way? Learn more about Abraham Lincoln as a boy, his upbringing, his time as a lawyer, and how he eventually became one of the most recognizable presidents in history.

Target Audience: Elementary and Middle School

Indiana State Standards:

1.1.8 (1st grade: Distinguish between historical fact and fiction in American folktales and legends that are part of American culture)

4.1.8 (4th grade: Summarize the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency on Indiana and describe the participation of Indiana citizens in the Civil War)

8.1.30 (8th grade: Using primary and secondary sources, analyze an issue confronting the United States from colonial times through the Reconstruction period)

Outcomes: Students will be able to explain Lincoln’s early life and how it influenced him as a leader and president. Students will learn from primary sources Lincoln’s personal thoughts and comments and will be able to recognize his specific handwriting and signature. Students will learn Lincoln’s preservation and leadership styles through his time as our president during the Civil War.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Title: Strength in Differences: Lincoln’s Cabinet and Generals    

Topic: Lincoln’s leadership skills; working with diverse groups of individuals

Description: Lincoln is known for his ability to work successfully with a wide range of individuals to execute winning strategies during the Civil War. His cabinet consisted of politicians from both parties who typically would not be working together. Learn more about the importance of engaging different individuals and various points of view to arrive at a successful strategy and accomplish meaningful goals through the collection’s primary and secondary source documents.

Target Audience: Upper Middle School students, High School students

Indiana State Standards:

4.1.8 (4th grade: Summarize the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency on Indiana and describe the participation of Indiana citizens in the Civil War)

IS 1.7 (High School: Analyze how the Civil War affected men, women, and children on the home front. Explain how those on the home front helped the war effort)

I.S. 1.36 (High School: Analyze multiple, unexpected and complex causes and effects of events in the past)

ICOM 1.2 (High School Communication: Assess and understand the impacts of a communication product on individuals, society, and the environment)

Outcomes: Students will be able to see and comprehend how different perspectives, thoughts, and experiences can collectively lead to better decisions. Students will identify primary sources and use them directly to draw conclusions about different subject matters. Students will be able to understand the complex issues surrounding the Civil War from a variety of perspectives.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Title: Indiana’s Boys in the Recent Unpleasantness: Veterans’ Firsthand Experiences in the Civil War

Topic: Explore through primary source documents what life was like for Indiana’s and other states’ soldiers during the Civil War.

Description: Students will learn through first-hand accounts what life was like on Civil War battlefields and in camp through soldiers’ letters and diaries. They will be able to appreciate what camp life, skirmishes, and major battles were like from the words of those who lived through it. Students will be able to compare textbook information with the firsthand accounts as well as identify common themes in various veterans’ writings.

Target Audience: Elementary students, Middle School students, High School students

Indiana State Standards:

IS.1.6 (High School: Describe causes and lasting effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the political controversies surrounding this time)

IS 1.7 (High School: Analyze how the Civil War affected men, women, and children on the home front. Explain how those on the home front helped the war effort)

I.S. 1.36 (High School: Analyze multiple, unexpected and complex causes and effects of events in the past)

Outcomes: Students will be able to utilize and identify causes and impact of the Civil War. They will be able to identify and use primary sources to understand human experiences in the Civil War. Students will be able to compare general knowledge with specific experiences and give them context.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Title: All That’s Fit to Print: Newspapers in the mid Eighteenth Century

Topic: Explore the newspapers of the mid 1800s, particularly those during Lincoln’s life, an activity that provides one with a unique look at life lived at the time.

Description: Investigating the newspapers of a particular time period provides one with a unique look at life lived at that time. Newspapers historically chronicle the lives and times of individuals both locally and nationally. It is enlightening for students to learn how newspapers were valued even when resources overall were scarce. The various editions regarding Lincoln’s assassination, the mourning borders, the Confederacy’s use of wallpaper for paper for their newspaper when they were running low on almost everything, and General Grant’s use of the Vicksburg paper to make his mark on a conquered area.

Target Audience: Elementary students, Middle School students, High School students

Indiana State Standards:

IS.1.6 (High School: Describe causes and lasting effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the political controversies surrounding this time)

IS 1.7 (High School: Analyze how the Civil War affected men, women, and children on the home front. Explain how those on the home front helped the war effort)

I.S. 1.36 (High School: Analyze multiple, unexpected and complex causes and effects of events in the past)

Outcomes: Students will understand the importance of preserving primary sources and contextualizing them in a larger historical understanding. Students will have an understanding of the elements and players of the Civil War and the lasting outcomes after the war. Students will be able to explain the multiple complexities to the Civil War and the lasting impact it has presently.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Title: Singing Through the War: Songsters and Music during the Civil War

Topic: Civil War Songsters and Music

Description: Some of the most insightful (and catchy) information about the Civil War comes from the creation of songsters and song sheets- lyrics on paper with decorative illustrations. These clever rewrites of popular songs allowed anyone familiar with the tune to catch on right away. This allowed large groups of people to join together- either for or against issues, political candidates, or even the war itself. Learn more about these important lyrics and the connectivity they bring to the Civil War period by looking at original documents.

Target Audience: Elementary students, Middle School students, High School students

Indiana State Standards:

1.1.3 (1st grade: Identify American songs and symbols and discuss their origins)

4.1.8 (4th grade: Summarize the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency on Indiana and describe the participation of Indiana citizens in the Civil War)

8.1.30 (8th grade: Using primary and secondary sources, analyze an issue confronting the United States from colonial times through the Reconstruction period)

IS.1.6 (High School: Describe causes and lasting effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the political controversies surrounding this time)

IS 1.7 (High School: Analyze how the Civil War affected men, women, and children on the home front. Explain how those on the home front helped the war effort)

I.S. 1.36 (High School: Analyze multiple, unexpected and complex causes and effects of events in the past)

Outcomes: Students will be able to read and understand song sheets and lyrics from the Civil War and the larger context of them in the war and on the home front. Students will identify primary sources and use them directly to draw conclusions about different subject matters. Students will be able to explain complex causes of the Civil War and explain how Indiana directly participated.

Evaluation: A post-presentation Q&A with the class will determine outcomes; a questionnaire will be sent out to teacher/class to complete either onsite or electronically after the presentation.

 

Videos:


Kids Want To Know: Abraham Lincoln 

Behind the Scenes: The Election of 1860

Behind the Scenes: The Lincoln Financial Foundation

Tad Lincoln’s Toy Soldiers